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Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast

Get actionable ideas, insight & inspiration to turn your real estate career into a life of freedom. Real Estate Uncensored delivers 3 live shows/wk showing you how to blend the latest high-tech and high-touch prospecting, sales and marketing strategies to grow your real estate business. Featuring interviews with mega agents like Joshua Smith, Jeff Cohn, Brett Tanner, Greg Harrelson, Jeff Latham, Aaron Wittenstein, Marti Hampton and many more. You’ll learn how to make 100+ calls/hr, how to use prospecting systems and scripts to sell 500 homes/yr, how to bring homes to market & actually get them sold, how to run high-tech open houses & much more. Co-hosted by Greg McDaniel, the "Junior Grandmaster" / Bay area Realtor, and Matt Johnson, partner in Elite Real Estate Systems / founder of Pursuing Results, a podcast PR + production firm.
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Now displaying: June, 2018
Jun 16, 2018

The rise of internet has brought more lead sources, but few of those leads convert. What are your options when it comes to attracting leads that are more likely to convert? Why is Facebook a better lead generation platform, and what kind of content should you use? What kind of content should you post on groups? In this episode, James Rembert shares the strategies he uses to help his clients ditch Zillow and get more sales from Facebook.

Video is essential, and as much as we want to take that as an option, video is not an option for us as agents. -James Rembert

Three Things We Learned

Home evaluations no longer work

When everyone offers the same thing, the message gets diluted. Paid advertising is all about unexpected, high-quality content that your audience isn’t seeing every day. The easiest route to creating interesting content is to write home lists or guides about the neighborhood where the property is found, or anything lifestyle driven.

Leverage Facebook groups

Find Facebook groups with people that you have something in common with, or with people that you know need your help. If you are an agent who is into fitness, join a fitness group. You never know when someone on there will be interested in watching a video about a park in your neighborhood and the houses listed on there.

Leads are a byproduct of building relationships

Facebook is great for getting your message out there, but it won’t generate leads. The relationships you build are your lead generators. Social media platforms help you get more eyes on your content. The challenge is to create content that is of interest to your audience, and build a relationship with them.

The strongest relationship builder is video. People love stories, and the most attention grabbing way to tell a story and share all the details is using video. The secret to successful videos is focusing on the quality of the information you provide without even mentioning that you are a real estate agent. If they are interested in finding out more, they will click on your page and find out what you do for a living anyway.

Guest Bio

James Rembert is the Zillow Killer. Using Facebook, he provides marketing solutions to real estate agents who want to get high-quality leads without investing large amounts of money in platforms like Zillow. You can find out more about James and his work at http://www.jamesrembert.com/ and for coaching you can find more information at www.JamesRembert.com/hld

Jun 15, 2018

We all have time consuming tasks we don’t want to do, but when is the right time to hire an assistant, and how much should we pay them? Should we look for assistants who have a similar personality to ours? What traits make an assistant great, and how can expensive is the turnover? In this episode, Kathleen Metcalf speaks about how picking the right assistant can make your life less stressful and help you earn more.

Most of the tasks you need a real estate agent to do, do not require a real estate license. -Kathleen Metcalf

Three Things We Learned

The perfect assistant is good at doing the things you hate

The secret to success is not constantly pushing yourself to do the things that make you miserable but finding people who are willing to do it for you and enjoy the process.

When you hire, make sure you don’t select a candidate who wants to be in sales or one that has your personality. You need someone who is all about systems and details. If you hire your clone, who is going to do the tasks you hate doing?

The formula for compensation

In the employment realm, compensation has to make sense in the context of the market, the value brought to the table and how much you are willing to pay. You should aim at earning at least 4-5 times more than you pay your assistant and move up to 9-10 times. But in order to move up on the scale, you need to make the hire in the first place.

Turnover is expensive

When you find someone that makes your life easier, make sure you have at least 3 months on your payroll in case you are experiencing a dip in business. Excellent assistants are hard to find and training someone takes both time and money. In the long-term, you are saving money if you work on keeping your turnover rate low.

The right assistant is detail and system oriented and doesn’t have any ambitions for the sales department. You have to make sure you don’t hire a wannabe agent but someone who enjoys administrative tasks. High-quality assistants are hard to find, and this is why when you find one, even if your business takes a dip due to a market shift, it’s wiser to keep your assistant instead hunting for a new one and training them.

Guest Bio

Kathleen Metcalf helps business owners find solutions to their problems and improve their communication with their team. She served as a bridge between entrepreneurs and assistants for over 6 years, and she was herself an assistant to top producing real estate agents. You can find her free guides to hiring, training and coaching at https://www.kathleenmetcalf.com/

Jun 12, 2018

Building a real estate business that spans over decades and market shifts takes more than hard work. What is the philosophy of the real estate business owners that manage to build a legacy? What’s the importance of building a reputation and how can you avoid staining it? And most of all, how do you build a safety net when you have slow months? In this episode, we are so excited to have the Grandmaster himself Terry McDaniel, on the show. He shares how his journey started 42 years ago and how he build a business from scratch.

A lead from the internet in my opinion is not a lead, it’s a response.- Terry McDaniel

Three Things We Learned

Don’t rely on coming up with the right answers on the spot

Potential clients have sometimes tough questions for you, you can’t come up on the spot with the right answer for everything. Some conclusions your prospects have are illogical from the beginning and you can’t fight that. But for the ones who are looking for solutions, you should have a script otherwise your answers won’t be satisfying.

Keep a clean reputation

Don’t do anything that you wouldn’t want to see in the newspaper. A reputation is hard to clean. Your job is to serve people and sometimes the best decision is not selling right now. You might lose some quick money but you win the respect of a prospect for life.These people will contact you when they are in need and refer you to others as well.

Have a safety net

Sometimes the clients you think you have in your hands will walk out and do business with someone else. You have to have a safety net, leads that you constantly nurture and communicate with. You never know when you touch someone on a personal level, even with a simple gesture such as a box of chocolate.

The real estate business is a people business, you won’t last in this industry for long unless you look at your job as a server of others. The best way to attract both sellers and buyers is to maintain a clean reputation. To do so, you have to work in the your client’s interest, even if it’s against yours. Sometimes the home shouldn’t be sold right now because the demand is low. This kind of attitude will get you remembered by your prospects and when the time is right for them to sell, you will be their agent.

Guest Bio

Terry McDaniel started his real estate business from scratch 42 years ago. He was long enough in the real estate industry to see how the technological advancements changed the game what it takes to build a long-lasting, successful business. Terry graduated with top honors from the the University of Wisconsin graduate business school and he is an active member in the Community Presbyterian Church.

Jun 9, 2018

Many real estate agents fall into the trap of doing what everyone is doing when it comes to branding, from advertising themselves as jack of all trades to using cliches in their tagline. But what message do you send to your prospects when you put “honesty”, “integrity,” and “trust” in your business description? Does it say something useful about what you do? Should you advertise yourself as a jack of all trades or go niche? In this episode, Tonya Eberhart, Michael Carr, and Gene Volpe talk about the power of narrowing your focus and avoiding cliches.

People don’t do business with a logo. They do it with a person. -Tonya Eberhart

Three Things We Learned

Marketing is all about standing out in the crowd

We sometimes end up doing the same thing as everyone else. When you start building your own brand, don’t just look at your skills and knowledge, but also at your personal traits and interests. What can you do to humanize your image?

Go niche

All of your marketing efforts should speak to your ideal customer. This not will only set you apart but it will also help you build a reputation in your segment. Many agents fear going niche. But by doing so, you aren’t excluding everyone else; you’re just narrowing your focus.

Avoid describing your business using cliches

Values such as high-quality service, trust, integrity, and honesty are plastered everywhere, yet they say nothing because everyone is using them. Worse, nobody believes agents that describes themselves like this. When you describe your business, you need to use something specific about your service that nobody else can offer in your area.

Many real estate agents believe that they should be experts in all areas of real estate, and this is what you were probably told after you got your license. But the truth is that you can’t do it all and maintain the same quality in all areas. Going niche is one of the shortest paths to getting recognized as an expert, especially if you focus on your buyer persona instead of hunting everything that moves. If someone needs help with finding a luxury home near a river, and you advertise yourself as the expert in that area, you will probably win the listing over someone who says he or she is a jack of all trades, simply because being an expert in all areas is less believable.

Guest Bios

Tonya Eberhart is a speaker, author of three books, and the founder of Brand Face. She helps real estate professionals, business owners, and improvement professionals build their brand and land more clients. One of the books she wrote, BrandFace for Real Estate Professionals, is written in collaboration with Michael Carr, a top selling real estate auctioneer.

Michael Carr is a top real estate auctioneer. He started his journey as an auctioneer in 1991, and in 1994 he got licensed as a real estate agent and made a shift towards selling homes. During his 24 years of experience, he has been involved in over 68,000 home sales across the country. Currently, he is the CEO of Michael Carr & Associates.


Gene Volpe is the founder of GVI Media and has over 10 years of experience in real estate marketing. With over 200 transactions under his belt, Gene is known as an authority in his field and is often invited to speak at events. You can find more about Gene at http://www.genevolpe.com/about-gene/#.

Jun 8, 2018

Both sellers and buyers work with the agents they know well, not the agents they’ve never heard about. How do you make sure more people know about you? Should you post content on social media? Should you market yourself as a jack of all trades or as an expert in one niche? In this episode, we talk about the importance of being top-of-mind and narrowing down your focus.

This is a game of eyeballs and ears. If we can capture the eyeballs and we capture the ears, we can get the business. -Greg Mcdaniel

Three Things We Learned

Find a category where you can be king

If you are new to the area and surrounded by older agents, it’s harder for you to be on top when your competition has been around for 10 or more years. But you don’t have to be the top Realtor. You can be the listing expert, or whatever suits your skills and talents. You don’t have to market yourself as a jack of all trades.

The 80-20 rule for content creation

Many agents either create too much content that has nothing to do with real estate or content that is only about real estate. You have to find a sweet spot between being someone who is just a realtor and posting content for fun. You need to humanize your brand, but at the same time you have speak about what you do for a living. If you can do 80% fun and 20% business, you are not going to fail.

Narrow down your focus

You may get mentally bored and try to focus on three things at the same time. But marketing is all about focus, not about going wide. Instead of building two businesses at the same time or trying to break into two niches, focus on only one. Unfortunately, most of these ventures fail because you can only spread yourself so much.

 

Your audience won’t remember you if you don’t find a way to stand out. In a competitive market, the riches are in niches and uniqueness. Everyone says they are the best agent in the area, but that doesn’t really say anything about them. You have to be more specific about what you do and why they should work with you. The best way to get other people to remember you is to be more than the realtor who pushes listings on social media. At least 80% of your content should fall under the “fun” umbrella, the type of content that shows your human side. You don’t need more than 20% to be focused on your business. If they like you and they know what you do, they will come to you.

Jun 6, 2018

Technological advancements scare us. What if we will be replaced? Should we look at new tools as helpers or enemies? Will administrative work be mostly replaced by AI? How will technology impact the way people socialize? In this episode, Gene Volpe shares his insights on how agents will be forced to embrace the technology or get left behind.

I don’t think we are really that far off that day of Alexa taking care of initial stages of buyer consultations. -Matt Johnson

Three Things We Learned

Google assistant might replace some of the admin work

Some assistant and admin work might disappear because Google is working on an assistant that will speak to service providers, clients, etc. Alexa is also not far behind from dealing with the initial stages of buyer consultations.

Adobe Capture CC takes photos of designs and saves the font and colors

If you’ve ever had someone design a brochure, you know how hard it is to recreate it. First you have to look for a similar font and then you need to pinpoint the right color. Adobe Capture CC helps you find both the font and the color just by taking a photo of a design you like.

Social media will be a shield against direct contact

Nobody answers to phone numbers they don’t know anymore, but everyone reads their texts. Social media will work as a shield between aggressive salespeople who want to push their services and prospects. You will no longer give a phone call unless the prospect gives you their contact information and is ready to move to the next stage.

 

Technological changes will force real estate agents to go full-time and learn more about technology and how people want to be contacted. Some people may lose their jobs, but those who learn how to use technology as tools to sell more and make their lives easier will thrive.

Tools such as Google Assistant and Alexa will only get better in time, but they won’t be able to replace human contact.

Jun 2, 2018

Converting leads over the phone is getting harder and harder. But why does this happen? Do people no longer want to be contacted over the phone? What is the best platform to be on right now as a real estate agent or team leader? On this episode, we discuss the death of phone prospecting in the near future and the rise of social media.

Now we are starting to use the phone as an insular so we don’t have to talk with the people we don’t know. -Matt Johnson

Three Things We Learned

Prospect on the right platform

Newer platforms make people more open and willing to look at content published by strangers. Facebook has already become a place where it’s harder to go viral and create business accounts that thrive. The reason behind this is that it’s users are more interested in the posts of their friends and family as opposed to content pushed by businesses. Instagram is now the platform where you should be promoting your business. It’s both new and popular enough to expose your content to a large audience.

Calling prospects will disappear in the near future

Calling prospects will either become illegal or it will no longer be culturally accepted. Most people don’t pick up the phone if they don’t know who is calling. Social media, on the other hand, is a safer way to interact. Platforms like Instagram attract through their novelty, and they don’t make people uncomfortable either.

Don’t ask people to buy from you

Nobody wants to be sold to. As a result, messages where you ask people to contact you if they need your services rarely work. Focus on building rapport first. You can’t ask for somebody’s trust and hard earned money if they don’t know who you are and what you do.

People are attracted to novelty. In the past, we were more open to picking up the phone and interacting with strangers. Today, we are no longer comfortable speaking with people we don’t know. Social media platforms are the same. In the beginning, we are attracted by its novelty and are more open to connecting with strangers. As time passes, we are less likely to connect with people outside our family, friends, and business contacts. Platforms like Instagram, where there is still novelty, are the places to go and push content to promote yourself.

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